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Malay selected for Batavia 4th Ward alderman; committed to collaboration

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Tony Malay has been selected as the new Batavia 4th Ward alderman. He will be sworn in at the Batavia City Council meeting Sept. 18.[]

BATAVIA – Tony Malay brings experience in what he describes as “building collaborative relationships” to the Batavia City Council. Aldermen obviously liked what they saw, selecting Malay as the new 4th Ward alderman from among three other highly qualified applicants at a committee meeting Sept. 12.

From his work as a Peace Corps volunteer in Africa to a teacher’s union representative in Kane County, Malay wants to use his people skills to maintain Batavia as a family-oriented community. He will be sworn in at the Sept. 18 Batavia City Council meeting to replace Paula Mueller, who resigned her aldermanic seat because she is moving out of the ward.

A Batavia resident for 14 years, Malay taught woodworking, drafting and building trades in Batavia School District 101 from 1998 to 2014. He served as president of the Batavia Education Association, the local teachers union, from 2006 to 2014.

Since then, Malay has been a director with the Illinois Education Association, representing teachers and education support professionals in the St. Charles, Kaneland and Burlington school districts.

During the interview with aldermen, the applicants were asked why they sought the appointment.

“The most government happens locally and has the most impact,” Malay said. “I want to preserve the high quality of life we have in Batavia.”

Also applying for the council seat were Joe Knopp, Jerry LaMonte and Mary Tiradani. After interviewing the four applicants, the council voted in closed session, followed by the announcement of Malay’s selection by Mayor Jeff Schielke.

Malay’s term of office will run until the April 2019 election. The 4th Ward covers the northeast side of the city. Batavia has seven wards, each represented by two aldermen.

Malay described the 4th Ward as the most diverse in the city. He said his decision-making philosophy is “the greatest good for the greatest number of people.”